Interview with a Data Scientist: Phillip Higgins

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Phillip Higgins is a data science consultant based in New Zealand. His experience includes financial services and working for SAS, amongst other experience including some in Germany.

What project have you worked on do you wish you could go back and do better?

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, we can always find things we could have done better in projects.  On the other hand, analytic and modelling projects are often frought with uncertainty- uncertainty that despite the best planning, is not available to foresight. Most modelling projects that I have worked on could have been improved with the benefit of better foresight!

What advice do you have to younger analytics professionals and in particular PhD students in the Sciences?

Firstly, I would advise younger analytics professionals to develop both deep knowledge of a particular area and at the same time, to broaden their knowledge and to maintain this focus of learning on both specialised and general subjects throughout their careers.  Secondly, its important to gain as much practice as possible – data science is precisely that because it deals with real-world problems.  I think PhD students should cultivate industry contacts and network widely- staying abreast of business and technology trends is essential.

What do you wish you knew earlier about being a data scientist?
Undoubtedly I wish I knew the importance of communication skills in the whole analytics life-cycle.  Its particularly important to be able to communicate findings to a wide audience and so refined presentation skills are a must.

How do you respond when you hear the phrase ‘Big Data’?

I think Big Data offers data scientists with new possibilities in terms of the work they are able to perform and the significance of their work.  I don’t think it’s a coincidence that the importance and demand of data scientists has risen sharply right at the time that Big Data has become mainstream- for Big Data to yield insights, “Big Analytics” need to be performed – they go hand in hand.

What is the most exciting thing about your field?

For me personally it’s the interesting people I meet along the way.  I’m continually astounded by the talented people I meet.

How do you go about framing a data problem – in particular, how do you manage expectations etc.  How do you know what is good enough?

I think its important to never lose sight of the business objectives that are the rationale for most data-scientific projects.  Although it is essential that businesses allow for data science to disprove hypotheses, at the end of the day, most evidence will be proving hypotheses (or disproving the null hypothesis).  The path to formulating those hypotheses lies obviously mostly in exploratory data analysis (combined with domain knowledge).  It is important to communicate this uncertainty as to framing from the outset, so that there are no surprises.

You spent some time as a consultant in data analytics.  How did you manage cultural challenges, dealing with stakeholders and executives?  What advice do you have for new starters about this?

In consulting you get to mix with a wide variety of stakeholders and that’s certainly an enjoyable aspect of the job.  I have dealt with a wide range of stakeholders, from C-level executives through to mid- level managers and analysts and each group requires a different approach.  A stakeholder analysis matrix is a good place to start- analysing stakeholders by importance and influence.  Certainly, adjusting your pitch and being aware of the politics behind and around any project is very important.